Posts Tagged ‘Eating Authors’

Eating Authors: Geoffrey A. Landis

No Comments » Written on August 22nd, 2016 by
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Geoffrey A. Landis

I’m writing this a bit further in advance than is my usual routine, because by the time it posts I’ll have been away at this year’s WorldCon for the past week, and I don’t expect to return home until tomorrow. But neither rain, nor sleet, nor excessive con-going activities can stop the weekly juggernaut that is EATING AUTHORS, and so here we are.

This week’s guest is the real deal; Geoffrey A. Landis isn’t just another SF author, he’s a card-carrying NASA scientist and is actively contributing to the work that will carry us to Mars and beyond! The accolades he’s received from the scientific community are paralleled by those in the SF community, including the Nebula Award, two Hugo Awards, both the Locus and Theodore Sturgeon Awards, as well as the Robert A. Heinlein Award “for outstanding published works in science fiction and technical writings that inspire the human exploration of space” which neatly bridges his two worlds.

If hard SF is your thing, you can’t do much better than reading Geoff’s stuff!

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Eating Authors: Mary Robinette Kowal

No Comments » Written on August 15th, 2016 by
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Mary Robinette Kowal

The last few days have been pretty exciting for me. Friday was World Elephant Day, and as such it seemed like an ideal date to announce that the fine folks at Tor Books had purchased a sequel to my novel Barsk: The Elephants’ Graveyard (we’re still working on a title). Then on Saturday, Barsk received the Cóyotl Award for Best Novel of 2015. Yesterday I did massive amounts of laundry and packed up so that today, Monday, I could fly off to Kansas City for an early arrival at the WorldCon.

I suspect this kind of frenetic pace is routine for this week’s EATING AUTHORS guest. Certainly she travels more than any other two authors I can name. I’ve known Mary Robinette Kowal since 2005 and have had the pleasure of watching her skills expand and her career explode. Nowadays she describes herself as a puppeteer and a novelist, but she’s known for being a voice actor, an art director, a past SFWA Board member, and an award-winning podcaster. Her work as an author has brought her the Campbell Award, multiple Nebula nominations, and two Hugo Awards, to say nothing of her legion of dedicated fans.

Mary’s Glamourist Histories series — often described as Jane Austen with magic — spans five volumes of utter delight (and not just because Doctor Who has a cameo in each volume). Tomorrow sees the release of her latest novel, Ghost Talkers, with as compelling a premise as anything you’re likely to hear (full disclosure: I heard Mary read a snippet from the book months ago and I’ve been hungering for it ever since). Take note, this is a title you’ll see on all the award short lists next year.

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Eating Authors: Randy Henderson

No Comments » Written on August 8th, 2016 by
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Randy Henderson

If you’re reading this on Monday morning (i.e., soon after it posts), please know that I have somehow managed to haul myself out of bed, visions of the glorious past four days at GenCon still dancing in my head, and dragged myself to the DayJob™ to toil away at vast amounts of data. Do Not Try This At Home.

Instead, I recommend you continue reading here, and meet this week’s EATING AUTHORS guest, Randy Henderson. Sorry, that’s about the best segue I can manage after completing three conventions in three weeks.

So what can I tell you about Randy? Well, he’s quirky. A self-described “milkshake connoisseur,” — seriously, what does that even mean? And what about malt? Huh, Randy, huh? — he took home the big prize from the Writers’ of the Future in 2014, and has since made a name for himself writing the Familia Arcana, a series of dark, funny, urban fantasy novels about Finn Gramaraye, a nice enough guy who gets framed for crimes of necromancy, and we’re off and running. The third book, Smells Like Finn Spirit isn’t due out until next March, but do go ahead and get started with the first two now, if you haven’t already discovered these books.

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Eating Authors: Todd J. Mccaffrey

No Comments » Written on August 1st, 2016 by
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Todd J. Mccaffrey

If you’re reading this at or soon after the time it posts on Monday morning, then I’ve likely somehow staggered into the office at the DayJob after a phenomenal but exhausting weekend as one of the GOHs at Confluence in Pittsburgh, PA. Which, of necessity, involved a long car trip to carry me back the roughly 300 miles from the west end of the state to the east, before I could sleep in my own bed last night. This is not a complaint. As I’ve remarked many times before, I think my life is pretty blessed. Rather, it’s an acknowledgment that time is laughing at most of us, and especially so at me, as in two days I leave for my third convention in three weeks.

Meantime though, let’s talk about EATING AUTHORS (you know the first words up there on the top of the page) and more specifically this week’s guest, Todd J. Mccaffrey. It’s a pretty safe bet that you’re familiar with the family name. It’s hard to imagine anyone involved in speculative fiction today who hasn’t read Pern. Todd, quite understandably picked up a lot of his writing skill from working with his mother, and soon was both collaborating on Pern novels, as well as penning a few on his own, and carrying on the family business. He also written a wide range of shorter works. And just this past May branched out with a powerful new novel, City of Angels, an edgy science thriller that asks some very human questions about what it means to be an A.I.

Todd may have started with dragons and thread, but he’s clearly going his own direction with a distinct and powerful voice.

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Eating Authors: Mary E. Lowd

No Comments » Written on July 25th, 2016 by
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Mary E. Lowd

As you know, Bob, my novel, Barsk, is anthropomorphic science fiction. And while I bristle when people attempt to describe it as “Babar in space,” the intention behind it is a fair one. It’s drawing on what they already know. After all, people have been reading about talking animals for a very long time. Somewhere along the line the animals started doing more previously human-only things (e.g., using tools, building cities, baking cakes, writing literary criticism), and this inevitable slide turned into what in today’s market constitutes “anthropomorphic” fiction.

This week’s EATING AUTHOR guest, Mary E. Lowd, is a popular writer and editor in a subgenre ghetto that gets very little attention from the daily reader of more traditional science fiction and fantasy. It’s arguably something of a niche market, and primarily served by a handful of very focused small presses. But for all that, it’s a thriving market and Mary’s done quite well there. She’s won the Ursa Major Award as well as two Cóyotl Awards for her own work, and has edited several of the best anthologies in the field. She also put otters in space long before I did.

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Eating Authors: N. S. Dolkart

No Comments » Written on July 18th, 2016 by
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N. S. Dolkart

A couple days from now my life gets a bit crazy. I’ll be starting a period of time (let’s call it five weeks) in which I attend four conventions (the qep’a’ cha’maHwejDIch, Confluence, GenCon Writer’s Symposium, and after a week’s break, the WorldCon). Or to put it another way, I’m looking at 23 days away from home out of 35, and that’s a bit much for me.

But have no fear, EATING AUTHORS will still be here for you, bright and early each Monday. As proof of that, even though I’m frantically packing and preparing Klingon certification exams, here’s N. S. Dolkart, this week’s guest. His first novel, Silent Hall debuted just last month from Angry Robot. It’s a fantasy that begins with a plague, and goes on to include wizards, gods, and a dragon. Seriously, he had me ay plague. Better still, Noah (yes, that’s what the N stands for) is already at work on a sequel.

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Eating Authors: David D. Levine

1 Comment » Written on July 11th, 2016 by
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David D. Levine

I generally attend several conventions a year, and as I’ve been doing this whole writer thing for a while now, I’ve had opportunity to meet a lot of authors. Some I see maybe once a year, on a panel or during a party. Some I manage to enjoy the occasional meal with here or there. And every now and then circumstances come along that involve an extended time with one or more writers. This week’s EATING AUTHORS guest and I took that to new levels last month, as we shared a condo for a week of intense critique and culinary exploration as part of the Rio Hondo writers’ retreat. But, while it was memorable for me, I don’t think that’s something that will be showing up on David D. Levine‘s wikipedia page. And besides, what happens in New Mexico stays in New Mexico, right?

More notably, David’s been shortlisted for the Campbell, Nebula, and Sturgeon Awards for his short fiction, and he’s taken home a Hugo. Ask most anyone, and they’ll tell you he’s an incredible short story writer. Which makes me all the more excited that his first novel, Arabella of Mars, comes out tomorrow from Tor Books. It reminded a great deal of those old Jack Vance planetary romances, updated to modern sensibilities, and then thrust backward into the world of steampunk. So, yeah, go get a copy, you’ll like it.

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Eating Authors: Adrian Tchaikovsky

1 Comment » Written on July 4th, 2016 by
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Adrian Tchaikovsky

Welcome to the first Monday in July, which if you’re in the USA you very well may have off from work as it’s what we like to call Independence Day. Which is as good a reason as any that this week’s EATING AUTHORS guest is from the UK.

Adrian Tchaikovsky is known far and wide for his popular (and currently ten volume strong) Shadows of the Apt series, which can be (poorly) described as a universe with assorted human-like races that differ from one another on the basis of various insect properties as well as whether or not they can wield magic. You know, that old trope.

He’s since started a new fantasy series, Echoes of the Fall (which begins with The Tiger and the Wolf), as well as a more traditionally SF novel (Children of Time). Meanwhile, his newest work, Spoils of War, comes out next week, the first book in Tales of the Apt, a companion series which will doubtless thrill fans of the earlier decalogy with a range of short stories addressing questions, events, backstories, and more that weren’t covered in the original novels.

Reaching out to new fans while managing to keep the old ones happy. Does it get any better than that?

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