Posts Tagged ‘Eating Authors’

Eating Authors: Karen Joy Fowler

No Comments » Written on June 23rd, 2014 by
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Karen Joy Fowler

If you’re in the northern hemisphere, welcome to Summer. If you’re somewhere that’s antipodean to Summer, well, please remember to dress warmly. To celebrate the change of seasons, EATING AUTHORS is proud to welcome Karen Joy Fowler.

Karen is dangerous; her books make you think (sometimes more than I might want to). Of her debut novel, Sarah Canary, she has remarked that she wanted SF readers to read it as SF, and mainstream readers to read it as mainstream. How is such a thing possible? For you or me, it’s probably not. For Karen, pish tosh, the proof that it can be done is there on the page.

She’s among that rare group of authors who has seen her work translated to the big screen (The Jane Austen Book Club) and she’s taken home many awards, including a handful of World Fantasy awards, two Nebula awards (out of nine nominations!), as well as the Pen/Faulkner and Shirley Jackson awards. And as if earning these prizes wasn’t enough, she’s also credited (along with Pat Murphy) with starting the James Tiptree Award.

Clearly, if you’ve not read her work before now, you really need to be asking yourself “why the hell not?”

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Eating Authors: Ty Franck

No Comments » Written on June 16th, 2014 by
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Ty Franck

Hello, and thanks for being here. If it’s Monday, that means you’ve survived both Friday the 13th and Father’s Day, and are now ready to face an exciting new week. I’m going to start you off right with today’s EATING AUTHORS guest, Try Franck. If you don’t immediately recognize his name, you’re probably nonetheless familiar with his writing. Ty partners with Daniel Abraham to comprise the pseudonym of James S. A. Corey, the author of The Expanse series of books (Leviathan Wakes, which was nominated for both the Hugo and Locus awards for best novel, Caliban’s War, Abaddon’s Gate, and Cibola Burn, which releases tomorrow!) as well as short stories and novellae (“The Butcher of Anderson Station”, “Gods of Risk”, and “The Churn”). For my money, this series is the best thing to hit Space Opera in a very long time.

And apparently I’m not the only one who thinks so. Earlier this year the Syfy channel green lighted (green lit?) a televisions show based on the series and ordered an initial ten episodes. Oh, baby!

But lest you worry that the television show is going to overtake the written word, set your mind at ease. At least two more novels and three more novellae are on order.

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Eating Authors: Sofia Samatar (Campbell Award nominee)

No Comments » Written on June 9th, 2014 by
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Sofia Samatar

Welcome to another special edition of EATING AUTHORS as we continue our sacred mission of introducing you to this year’s Campbell Award nominees. Max Gladstone was featured last year during his first term of eligibility, and Wesley Chu landed here a few months back in the regular course of the blog. Over the last two weeks you’ve met Ramez Naam and Benjanun Sriduangkaew, which leaves this week’s participant, Sofia Samatar.

She’s been having a year that few authors get to experience. In addition to her Campbell nomination, Sofia’s debut novel, A Stranger in Olondria, was a finalist for the Nebula Award, and her short story, “Selkie Stories Are for Losers,” was nominated for both the Nebula and the Hugo. All of that aside, she won me over when I learned she has a PhD in African Languages and Literature. Seriously, how cool is that?

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Eating Authors: Benjanun Sriduangkaew (Campbell Award nominee)

1 Comment » Written on June 2nd, 2014 by
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I’ve had a busy weekend, day-tripping to downtown Philadelphia Thursday through Saturday for a Writers’ Retreat that was wonderful but exhausting. My Sunday plans to recuperate took a hit with the news of the passing of Jay Lake, but in some ways that makes today’s EATING AUTHOR post, the next of this year’s Campbell Award Nominees meals, all the more appropriate. Jay was a staunch supporter of the Award, having commissioned the design of the five-pointed star (made of pen nibs) pin which is now presented to all nominees, as well as the fabled Campbell Tiara.

Which brings us to Benjanun Sriduangkaew, a short story writer whose work has appeared in such magazines as Clarkesworld, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, and anthologies like Solaris Rising 3, The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Eight, The Mammoth Book of Steampunk Adventures, and Space Opera. Regardless of how things go with the Campbell, you’re going to want to keep an eye on this author. She’s clearly at home in many sub-genres, and if you’re not a fan of one or the other, she’s likely to pull you in anyway!

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Eating Authors: Ramez Naam (Campbell Award nominee)

1 Comment » Written on May 26th, 2014 by
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Ramez Naam

Coming in August, the Worldcon will descend upon the city of London, England, and amidst other acts of frenzy there will be an awards ceremony at which the Hugo Awards get handed out. Somewhere during the course of that evening one lucky and talented author will receive the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. I’ve had the pleasure of being short-listed for that prize, and as a consequence when I started the EATING AUTHORS blog series I made it a point to invite the nominees for this award and do my part to give them a bit more exposure, preferably with enough lead time for voters to get to know them and their work before sending in their ballots.

This year’s nominees are Wesley Chu, Max Gladstone, Ramez Naam, Sofia Samatar, and Benjanun Sriduangkaew. Wesley and Max have already been featured on the blog, but do click those links and re-familiarize yourself with who they are and what they do. Meanwhile over the next three Mondays, I’ll be bringing you the other Campbell nominees, beginning this week with Ramez Naam.

The first thing you should know about Ramez is that in 2005 he was the recipient of one of the coolest-sounding awards ever (the HG Wells Award for Contributions to Transhumanism). In addition to being an author, he’s also a computer scientist and a futurist. His specialties include collaboration, communication, and information retrieval; it would not surprise me to find that his site has the best optimization on the web (which makes me a little scared what effect this post will have on my own quiet domain).

Take some time to read about his most memorable meal, and then follow one or more of the links to read up on this nominee for the Campbell Award!

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Eating Authors: Jaye Wells

No Comments » Written on May 19th, 2014 by
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Jaye Wells

My guest this week here at EATING AUTHORS is Jaye Wells. She has what must surely be the best possible pedigree any writer could ask for. Which is to say, she was raised by booksellers. And while all such children might not grow up to become authors, there’s a certain sense of predestination, a feeling of “coming home” that I imagine both she and her parents must have felt as she set out on her career.

Jaye is the author of the Sabina Kine series of novels and short fiction, as well as the Prospero’s War trilogy (book three due out next March), both published by the fine folks at Orbit. Her bio insists she likes to travel and drink good bourbon. As you’re about to find out, she also likes good food.

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Eating Authors: Alethea Kontis

4 comments Written on May 12th, 2014 by
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Alethea Kontis

Yesterday was Mother’s Day (and also my own mother’s birthday — a two-fer!), so by some small stretch of the imagination I think I can declare today to be Princess Day. This is especially convenient as today’s EATING AUTHOR guest is none other than the self-identifying princess Alethea Kontis.

I can honestly say I’ve known Alethea since before either of us had published a book (and yes, she was still both a princess and a force of nature, even back then). Her children’s books are a thing of wonder, literally and figuratively. There’s just something magical about anthropomorphizing the letters of the alphabet that must surely leave a young reader forever changed. Switching gears to non-fiction, she’s also the co-author (with Sherrilyn Kenyon) of the hugely popular The Dark-Hunter Companion, which just goes to show what can happen when you attend a convention, meet a best selling author and just start talking. She also has several collections of essays, and I encourage you to take a look at them because, seriously, how often do you get to see the world through a princess’s eyes?

But best of all (at least to me) are the books in her Woodcutter Sisters series. Reading them is like falling into the world of Andrew Lang’s Fairy Books, all mixed together into one enormous tale, with the consistent logic and worldbuilding you never get in fairy tales. In other worlds, sheer brilliance! The first two, Enchanted and Hero, have received Norton Award nominations (and we’ll find out the results for that second book in less than a week!), and the third volume, Dearest, will be out in February. Honestly, I don’t know how I’m going to wait that long.

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Eating Authors: Tom Doyle

No Comments » Written on May 5th, 2014 by
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Tom Doyle

It’s May, and as often happens when I prepare one of my first blog posts in May, I have Julie Andrews and Vanessa Redgrave dancing and singing in my head. You know, the number from Camelot. Or maybe you don’t. Anyway, that’s neither here nor there as they say. I’m just glad it’s May and I can have a greater expectation of reasonable weather patterns.

None of which has anything to do with this week’s EATING AUTHOR guest, Tom Doyle, unless of course you want to make a stretch and conflate seasonal rebirth with tomorrow’s release of American Craftsmen, Tom’s first novel. Sure, that will work.

I have to tell you up front that I’m especially happy to see Tom’s novel coming out because I had the privilege to publish his first collection a couple years ago. And I had no choice. I had to publish him. I’d attended a reading he’d done at Capclave (a D.C. area convention that I heartily endorse) and the sheer intensity of his reading demanded that I do all within my meager powers to get his stories out into the world in a book. Tom packs more raw stuff into a short story than any other author I know, and I’m eager to see what he does with the greater elbow room a novel affords.

What more can I tell you about him? He’s won the WSFA Small Press Award, as well as the Writers of the Future Award. He can tell you anything you want to know about premillennialist apocalyptic fiction. And as you’ll garner from his remarks below, he’s been a lawyer. Best of all, I get to call him my friend.

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